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Internet Birth Place : Where the Internet was born.

UCLA's Interface Message Processor (IMP) (R) is pictured in the birthplace of the Internet, at 3420 Boelter Hall, the original location of the first ARPANET node at UCLA in Los Angeles, California June 2, 2011. UCLA professor Leonard Kleinrock and his team used the IMP, the packet-switching node used to interconnect participant networks to the ARPANET to send the first message, the letters LO to Stanford Research Institute on October 29, 1969.


Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at UCLA Leonard Kleinrock is seen in the birthplace of the Internet, at 3420 Boelter Hall in UCLA, July 27, 2011.


UCLA professor Leonard Kleinrock and his team used the IMP, the packet-switching node used to interconnect participant networks to the ARPANET to send the first message, the letters LO to Stanford Research Institute on October 29, 1969.


A detailed view of UCLA's Interface Message Processor (IMP) is seen in a storage closet,where it had been stored for over 20 years, at 3420 Boelter Hall in UCLA, May 3, 2011.


A detailed view of UCLA's Interface Message Processor (IMP) is pictured in a storage closet, where it had been stored for over 20 years, at 3420 Boelter Hall in UCLA, May 3, 2011.


A detailed view of UCLA's Interface Message Processor (IMP) is pictured in a storage closet.


UCLA computer scientists are pictured in the birthplace of the Internet at the original location of the first ARPANET node, at 3420 Boelter Hall in UCLA in this undated photograph provided by UCLA.


A blackboard with the letters LOG and LO, is pictured in 3420 Boelter Hall at UCLA, May 3, 2011.


UCLA's Interface Message Processor (IMP) is pictured in a storage closet, where it had been stored for over 20 years by UCLA professor Leonard Kleinrock and his team, at 3420 Boelter Hall in UCLA, May 3, 2011.


The original log book detailing UCLA professor Leonard Kleinrock and his team using the Interface Message Processor (IMP), is seen at 3420 Boelter Hall in UCLA, May 3, 2011.


A teletype similar to one used to communicate with the Sigma 7 computer which was connected to UCLA's Interface Message Processor (IMP) in the birthplace of the Internet.


Professor Leonard Kleinrock, Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at UCLA is shown next to UCLA's Interface Message Processor (IMP) in the birthplace of the Internet.

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Source: onlinefoktai.com
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